I Converted to Islam Without Ever Meeting a Muslim

I would spend time conducting searches online, looking for the stories of people who had gone through this experience themselves. Nothing ever seemed to quite fit the bill - each person's journey, of course, is unique. It is good to know, however, that others have gone down this same path as you. Put simply, I turned to these resources when I became afraid I'd be seen as an oddball.

Online resources are great to find out how to pray in Arabic, to listen to the Qur'an read out loud or perhaps to listen to some Islamic music. For me, music was a great way of picking up some of the phrases I wanted to start to use.

Key in all of this, though, is that I questioned absolutely everything – as is absolutely necessary in a religious conversion. You question yourself. You question what you hear, and what you read.

If something doesn't feel right to you, then it's a clear indication that it's not for you. You have to listen carefully to your intuition and your heart.

Working through this process took me about 18 months. Some people take less time, some people more. And I was doing all this on my own, with no-one to help. I still hadn't met any Muslims.

After those 18 months, however, I considered myself a Muslim. I was praying five times a day, fasting for Ramadan, and eating and drinking only what was considered acceptable according to the teachings of the Qu'ran.

It was only then I found out that there was actually a small mosque in my town. I popped along, knocked on the door and introduced myself.

They were surprised to see me and didn't know quite what to do with me at first, except to give me the mosque door combination and to welcome me to their community. I was accepted from the very beginning, however, and am now a constant within the community.

I still had things to learn, of course.

What is Islam and how do you divorce that religion from somebody's culture? It's important to point out that it's Islam you have to accept, rather than any cultural specificities from out in the world. You always retain the freedom to define your own identity, so long as you stay true to the written tenets of the Qu'ran.

So I am now a white, middle-aged Scottish Muslim. And happy with it.